The Best Way to Insure Your Mortgage

, ,
If you have a mortgage, it makes good sense to insure it. Owning a debt-free home is an objective of any sound financial plan. In addition, making sure your mortgage is paid off in the event of your death will benefit your family greatly. The question is, should you purchase this coverage through your lending institution or from a life insurance company? A good rule of thumb to follow when searching for advice? Ask an expert! So, while it might be convenient when completing the paper work for your new mortgage to just sign one more form, be aware that it might be a costly decision.

Tax Tips You Need To Know Before Filing Your 2022 Taxes

, , ,
It’ll be time to file your 2022 taxes soon, and you must take advantage of every tax credit and deduction you can! Our article covers the following: • Canada Workers Benefit. • Claiming home office expenses. • The tax deduction for zero-emissions vehicles. • Return Of Fuel Charge Proceeds To Farmers Tax Credit. • Eligible Educator School Supply Tax Credit.

Whole Life Insurance – A Whole New Asset Class

, ,
The recent developments in investment markets and the volatile performance that has resulted have brought about a new appeal to an old workhorse. For investors looking for a diversification in their investment portfolio and a more tax-efficient fixed income investment alternative, a compelling argument can be made for the use of Whole Life Insurance.

Federal Budget 2023 Highlights

, , , , , ,
On March 28, 2023, the Federal Government released their 2032 budget. This article highlights the following financial measures: • New transfer options associated with Bill C-208 for intergenerational transfer. • New rules for employee ownership trusts. • Changes to how the Alternative Minimum Tax is calculated. • Improvements to Registered Education Savings Plans. • Expanding access to Registered Disability Savings Plans. • Grocery rebate. • Deduction for tradespeople tool expenses. • Automatic tax filing. • New Canadian Dental Care Plan.

Ontario 2023 Budget Highlights

, , , ,
On March 23, 2023, the Ontario Minister of Finance delivered the province’s 2023 budget. Our article covers the highlights as follows: • Corporate tax credits. • Indirect tax changes. • Increased healthcare options. • Supporting communities. • Supporting the economy and infrastructure.

Estate Equalization for Family Business Owners

, ,
In the planning of their estates, most parents might prefer to leave their assets in equal shares to their children. Often, the only complication in this scenario could be how to divide up the family home. For owners of a family business, however, the concept of treating the children equally can often be much more problematic. This can especially be the case where one or more children are active in the business while others are not.

Alberta 2023 Budget Highlights

, , , , , , ,
On February 28, 2023, the Alberta Minister of Finance announced the 2023 budget. We have highlighted the most important financial measures you need to know, with an emphasis on the following: • Tax credits. • Decreased education property tax. • Investing in education, tourism and infrastructure.

British Columbia 2023 Budget Highlights

, , , , , , , , , ,
On February 28, 2023, the B.C. Minister of Finance announced the 2023 budget. We have highlighted the most important financial measures you need to know: • Tax credit changes. • Increases to the B.C Family Benefit. • Carbon tax changes. • Other important tax changes. • Healthcare and housing spending.

TFSA versus RRSP – What you need to know to make the most of them in 2023

, , ,
When looking to save money in a tax-efficient manner, Tax-Free Savings Accounts (TFSA) and Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSP) can offer significant tax benefits. The main difference between the two is that TFSAs are ideal for short-term goals, such as saving for a down payment on a house or a vacation, as its growth is entirely tax-free, while RRSPs are more suitable for long-term goals such as retirement. When comparing deposit differences, TFSAs have a limit of $6,500 for the current year, while RRSPs have a limit of 18% of your pre-tax income from the previous year, with a maximum limit of $30,780. In terms of withdrawals, TFSAs have no conversion requirements and withdrawals are tax-free, while RRSPs must be converted to a Registered Retirement Income Fund (RRIF) at age 71 and withdrawals are taxed as income.

Is the Life Insurance Industry in Canada Stable?

, ,
Given the problems encountered by some large financial institutions in the United States, how concerned should we be about the state of the life insurance industry in Canada?